Timbers: Where Goonies Go To Die

The atmosphere around the Timbers this week is noticeably lighter than it was after the weekend. A victory, at home of course, against Conference leaders San Jose Earthquakes was followed by news that the team had traded for Colorado Rapids right-back Kosuke Kimura.

I don’t know a great deal about Kimura, so I won’t comment too much about it except to say that I can only hope we’ve found the right guy for a position that’s been a problem since day one which is strange for “one of the easiest positions to play if you’ve got half a brain.”

By the way, what does that say about the guys who haven’t exactly excelled themselves at full back for the Timbers?

Kimura will go straight into the team, which you would assume would see Jewsbury back into central midfield. I wouldn’t be surprised if we saw Nagbe pushed out wide again rather than rested, which is what I think would be the best thing for him and the team.

Back to the game…

The visit of one of the league’s hottest teams, after a match where the Timbers failed to master even the basics, didn’t exactly inspire confidence. And yet, there was always the sense that winning this match was just something Portland would do, backed up by ridiculously daft stats about the team’s record when the moon was full. Don’t drink and Microsoft Excel, kids.

The hashtags quickly turned from #WhyWeLost to #WhyWeWillWin on twitter as the fans’ gallows humour turned to, at times self-deprecating, hope.

Tactically, not much changed in the team’s approach from the Rapids match to this one. John Spencer still had the team lined up in 4-4-2, with Lovel Palmer replacing Diego Chara. Nagbe seemed to play a but deeper, perhaps to compensate for the fact that Lovel Palmer is not Diego Chara.

While it was a better performance all round for Nagbe, his defensive work was probably the most marked.

He had a couple of good touches in attack, but still seems a yard or so of the pace. He looks like he’s missing a bit of sharpness, and he’s been leaned on pretty heavily for a second year pro.

It may be that Kimura’s signing will bring Jewsbury into midfield, and allow Nagbe to rest and recharge the batteries. Certainly, a Jewsbury/Chara midfield seems more up Spencer’s alley than a Chara/Alexander one, and Jewsbury’s move to full-back may be the reason why Nagbe hasn’t had a break yet.

Of course, the loser from Chara’s return will probably be Lovel Palmer. While Palmer wasn’t bad – he even managed to get a shot on target, which is probably a bad sign for those seeking portents of an impending apocalypse – there’s simply no getting round the face that he’s not Diego.

Apart from general work rate and presence, Palmer’s ball skills lag those of Chara. The most telling instance what 70 minutes in, with the Timbers up by 2, but being pressed back by rolling attacks from San Jose.

On getting the ball, there wasn’t even a moment’s thought of looking for an easy pass – right in front of him to Nagbe, who in turn had Songo’o just out of shot, but free, on the right flank – but rather he just got his head down and put his foot through the ball. Mwanga ends up giving away a foul in trying to chase down the ball.

While you can understand it on one level – he got the ball out of the “danger area” after all – it only hands possession right back to the opponents. It’s one of my pet hates. I’m not a tactics nazi who disdains long-ball football – though I’m not a big fan of it either – but it’s not a defensive strategy. It’s a sign of panic, and like a drop of blood in the water will only encourage the piranhas to attack even more, so launching the ball back at your opponents and drooping ever deeper will only bring them further upon you.

Nerves play a factor in this. A confident team rarely close out a match by punting the ball up the pitch but instead will look to kill the opponents momentum by retaining the ball and frustrating the team chasing the match.

Palmer’s play was indicative of the team as a whole as the match wore on, and it’s understandable that a team who had lost so many late goals would suffer from Squeaky Bum Syndrome against a team dubbed “The Goonies” for their reluctance to accept defeat. Nevertheless, I felt we really missed the often undervalued side of Chara’s game – his ability to keep it simple.

The difference between the two players is pretty apparent. Chara is all across the midfield, linking up play and keeping the ball moving. Palmer plays much more narrowly, and is more prone to resort to the long, hopeful ball.

Unsurprisingly, the goal did come for San Jose a couple of minutes later. Fortunately, the Timbers held on to record the win, but it wasn’t for the lack of effort on San Jose’s part. They’ll certainly feel that their second half efforts warranted at least a point from the match.

The first half had been pretty level, with very little between the teams in terms of passes, though San Jose were a bit more accurate (73%-67%). The second half though was a completely different beast.

The Timbers made almost 100 fewer passes in the second half, and dropped to 59% in accuracy. San Jose made a few more passes, and held their accuracy rate at 72%. The possession split went from around 50/50 in the first to somewhere near 35/65 in San Jose’s favour in the second.

No-one with even a passing acquaintance with either team would be surprised by those stats. The Timbers have an uncanny ability to throw games away late on, and San Jose have been free-scoring.

Alan Gordon’s strike was the only breach in the Timbers goal. The ex-Timber set up a heart-stopping final few minutes, but a Timbers defence led by David Horst refused to give way.

Though San Jose still made chances – Lenhart missed an absolute sitter earlier in the half – Horst marshaled the back line pretty well. It was a statement game for Horst who really stood out with some good tackling and presence at the back, and a threat from attacking set plays.

With Mosquera now free of suspension, it’ll be interesting to see if either of Horst or Futty are benched to make way. Given the way Spencer has tended to stick with what worked, I could conceivably see Mosquera riding the bench against Real Salt Lake at the weekend. Mosquera has been a totemic figure at the back for Portland this year though, so any decision to bench the Colombian had better be met with a solid defensive display on the pitch, or questions will inevitably be asked.

Moving further up the pitch, Franck Songo’o deserves a special mention. He was subbed out early against Colorado, and that must surely have stung. He responded with an imperious showing from a right-wing position where he tormented the Rapids back line.

He played a two key roles in the Timbers first goal – winning the ball and delivering the key final pass.

The interplay between Songo’o and Alexander got the team out of defence and over the halfway line, and the attacking instinct of Mwanga drove him past his marker to get the killer touch on a move that will be used in classrooms to demonstrate the concept of counter-attacking at speed. 90 yards, three men, three passes and a goal.

Songo’o also had a part in the Timbers’ second. His free kick from deep saw Futty challenge the keeper and the ball broke kindly for Jewsbury to poke home from close range. It was one of those goals where I expected the free kick to be called on Futty for having the temerity to fairly challenge the keeper, but in a rare MLS Referee With Common Sense moment, the goal stood.

The big worry now is that Songo’o’s participation ended with an injury. With Alhassan potentially still out, there’s no way that Spencer would want to having Songo’o out too. It leaves options out wide very limited as Rodney Wallace, who has filled in at left-wing, is still struggling with injury too, and Sal Zizzo has thus far failed to convince he is anything other than a late game sub to stretch tiring defenses.

It’s one reason why I wouldn’t be surprised to see Nagbe played wide, with a Jewsbury/Chara middle and Alexander on the other flank.

Eric Alexander also had a pretty good game on the left-wing, so I expect he’ll remain in a wide role, even if I feel he’s better suited to playing in the middle. He doesn’t seem entirely comfortable out wide, but the return of Jewsbury to contention in the middle leaves that area heavily congested, so it’s hard to see Eric getting much of a chance there.

The victory was just what the team and fans needed after the Colorado match. The team’s form at JELD-WEN is both a source of pride and frustration. Only RSL and Vancouver have picked up more home points than the Timbers in the Western Conference. Yet the team continues to show a Mr T like aversion to travel as only Dallas have fewer points on the road. If the Timbers could produce away form that even approached that of their home, they’d be sitting comfortably in the play-off positions.

Perhaps expecting a first away win of the season at RSL is a bit too much, but all Timbers fans will be hoping for at least some of the passion and verve that they show at home.

John Spencer faces a couple of selection headaches ahead of this weekend, and I worry that pulling Casablanca and setting out to “Play It Again, Sam*,” will come a cropper, but at least we can go into it with the afterglow of a victory behind us. I suspect that we’ll be setting out to play on the counter, with Jewsbury and Chara hunkering down in the middle. It’s not really made for exciting, free-flowing attacking football in the past, but as long as a play-off spot remains a possibility I suspect aesthetics will (continue to) be ignored in pursuit of points.

As a wise frog once said, “It’s not easy being green.

PTFC

* Yes, I know.

Just Another Timbers Loss

The Timbers lost again, suffering their biggest defeat since going down 4-0 in Dallas a year ago but in some ways this 3-0 loss in Colorado was even more dispiriting.

In beating Seattle last week the Timbers had finally shown a spark of what John Spencer has been telling us their capable of, with some good wing play and incisive attacking. This week saw a return of the bad old Timbers and, you know what, it’s really fucking pissing me off.

Here’s a short, Scottish summation or my thoughts…

Aner fuckin loass. Goatae say, ah’m gettin mare th’n a wee bit fucked off wae this shite. It’s no the loassin that pisses me aff, it’s the fuckin wey we dae it. Thur’s nae fuckin heart tae this shower. Lose wan fuckin goal and it’s gemme o’or.

Spenny disnae seem tae huv a fuckin scooby whit he’s daein maist ae the time. It’s no workin? Nae both’r, ah’ll jist take wan cunt oot and pit aner yin oot tae dae the same fuckin hing that wisnae fuckin workin in the fucking first place, for fuck sake. It giy dis yir fuckin heid in.

Ah wannae hope fur the best against yon Urthquakes oan Tuesday nicht, but it’s kinna hard, ken whit ah mean? Ye cun oanly eat so much shite afore it comes back up, and ah’ve hud ma fill.

Will we win? Fucked if ah ken. We’ll miss wee Diego fur share, but it’d jist be lik the Timburs tae fuckin win like we did against yon Sportin mob a while ago.

Aner loass, and fuck, who kens? How long dis Spenny get? How long’s a piece a string? Ah don’t ken whit’s goan oan there. Tae bae hoanest, ah’ve kinna loast faith in the gaffer, ken? How’s he still in a joab efter Cal FC n aw that, fuck knows.

Hing is, ah’ll be back tae support’n the boiys the morra, giein it laldy. Thur’s nae skulking awa’. The hing aboot being a fan is yir eiweys there.

Rose City till ah dee.

Anyway… Where was I?

I said last week that I worried we’d go out there and just blindly repeat what worked before, and guess what? We only fucking did. Sure Zizzo came in to replace the injured Alhassan, but the plan was the same as last week.

Spencer is like the guy at the roulette table who won big on red once and is going to stick to that strategy because it clearly works even as he’s offering blow jobs in the fucking casino toilets for another ten bucks to throw away.

I mean, for fuck sake. I’m sick of this shit.

What annoyed so much me isn’t the losing, though no-one likes that, it’s the way we lost. Rolled over and let the Rapids tickle our bellies. It was so bad to watch that to take my mind off it, I spent much of the second half thinking up #timbersmovienames on twitter with other fans.

I don’t expect a team that’s going to buy it’s way to success, or win every week. I do expect a modicum of fucking effort and intelligence. I saw neither this week. I saw a spineless performance, led by a manager who, I’m beginning to suspect, never fucking had it in the first place to lose it.

We hear Spencer is a great coach, so who has improved under his guidance? So he’s a motivator, right? Except the team I saw wearing green on Saturday showed all the motivation of a hooker on her eighth john of the night – sure, she might make the right noises, but her heart’s clearly not in it.

And it’s not the fucking first time either. How often do we only get 45 minutes of effort of out this team? A shambolic, lazy first half followed by a rocket up the arse at half time, or a decent first half, then a snooze through the second? What. The. Fuck?

We didn’t even get that this week. Sure I could go through it with pics and graphs and all that shit, but why fucking bother? We were shit; a shambles. You know it, I know it, Colorado sure as fuck know it. HashtagRCTID does a good enough job of it, anyway.

Steven Smith had his worst game for the Timbers. He played like he was still on honeymoon. I can only assume that Brian Mullan has horrific B.O. cos Smith didn’t seem to want to get anywhere near him all game.

Last week he and Songo’o looked so effective and threatening down that flank, but they may as well have stayed in Portland. Both ended up being subbed – Songo’o in the first half, Smith in the second.

Smith looked gassed. Was it the heat and altitude? If so, why the fuck didn’t the team fly in earlier to prepare? If anyone should know about the problems with playing at the Rapids, it should be Spencer since he played there himself.

Another bad day at the office for Darlington Nagbe too. Where is the player who started the season? He looks a shadow of himself. Gone is the zip and verve, the daring and dramatic. In comes a player who looks tired, needs an extra touch and is off the pace. He’s repeatedly being caught in possession and even when he’s not, he doesn’t seem to have any clear idea what he’s hoping to achieve.

The role that Spencer has him playing in, at the tip of the diamond, should be the creative fulcrum for the attack. It’s a dead end right now.

Yet Spencer keeps putting him in, and keeps playing the same way. Tactically, he’s a dinosaur. He’s a second year manager, and he already looks like he’s twenty years late to the party. The Timbers play like a mediocre British team from the early 90’s. It’s like the last twenty years of footballing innovations have completely passed him by.

Maybe it’s not surprising. Spencer was inculcated in that system throughout his playing career. 442 was king. MLS is beginning to show some innovation and moving towards a more modern, nuanced attitude towards tactical flexibility and playing style, and yet the Timbers are stuck in this kick-and-rush, blood-and-thunder time loop. We’re outdated.

It’s never been more clear than now, when Euro 2012 has served up some delightful, modern, football. Going back to watching the Timbers is like going to McDonalds after eating at a Gordon Ramsey restaurant.

He’s either too bloody-minded to recognise the fact that his “system” doesn’t fucking work, or doesn’t even realise. Neither of these are good things.

Or perhaps, this is the only way he can play with the guys he’s got? Maybe he’d love to go Full Bielsa on us, but he can’t. I doubt there’s much more to him than what we’ve seen, but who knows?

Sure, the team might lift their performance level now and then, and beat a poor Seattle (who seemed to have got MMA and MLS mixed up on the trip south), but we’ll inevitably regress to the mean.

Regardless, the same old faces will be in the XI. There are some decent young players in the roster – Jean-Baptiste, Richards, Rincon, Kawulok to name but four – but they can’t get a sniff of first team action.

On one hand, I can understand Spencer’s reticence. He knows it’s not going well, and he probably feels he can’t “risk” the kids for fear that they lose the match that costs him his job – though considering he’s survived the Cal FC debacle, the dire Galaxy showing, and this gutless shitfest, I suspect the only two things that’ll survive a nuclear holocaust are cockroaches, and John Spencer as head coach of the Portland Timbers.

The thing is, it’s not really a risk, is it? Neither Fucito – despite his great workrate, which I do admire – nor Mwanga have exactly hit the ground running. Even Boyd has looked a shadow of himself at times. Nagbe looks like he needs a break. Jewsbury isn’t a right back. Horst goes from the sublime to the ridiculous. Is Brunner ever going to be fit again? Palmer… Yeah.

Why not blood some of the young guys? At least they might care. And at this stage, I don’t think many Timbers fans are keeping play-off dates clear in their calenders, you know?

As I said, I don’t expect wins every week. If I was a gloryhunter, I’d have grown up supporting Rangers or Celtic, just up the road. Instead, I supported my local team, Kilmarnock, through bad times, allright times, more bad times, and a couple of good times.

So it is for all Timbers fans. This is our team, and we don’t expect the moon on a stick. All we want is a team that care enough to give 100% every single week, not just when the ESPN cameras are in town, and a manager who knows what he’s doing.

Tomorrow we play San Jose Earthquakes, and we’ll be missing the one outfield player who can hold his head up high week after week, Diego Chara. It’s no surprise the yellows have accumulated considering the way he plays – and the fact he’s often had to do that defensive job single-handedly – but it’s a huge blow to have him miss this match.

This is a team that are flying this year – they finished 2011 four points behind the Timbers, but already twenty points ahead this year and top the Western Conference. The Earthquakes come into the game on the back of a remarkable come-from-behind 4-3 win against LA Galaxy, so the omens aren’t good.

Do I think it’s time for Spencer to go? It’s getting harder and harder to justify supporting him. The whole “who’ll replace him, then?” argument is bullshit. Who’ll replace him? Who the fuck knows – that’s why you accept applications and select the best candidate.

I don’t know. I’m angry. I’m rapidly losing faith in Spenny. He’s showing nothing on the field, but I always held to the belief that he does good work on the training ground, and maybe all he needed was someone alongside to nudge him in the right direction, tactically. Now I’m not so sure about his off-field endeavours. This really doesn’t look like a team that’s busting a gut for their manager.

Knowing the Timbers, they’ll go and beat San Jose on Tuesday, with Palmer smashing one in from 30 yards*, and everything will be rosy – pardon the pun – again. I’ll get the “so what do you think now?” questions. Which would be fine. I really hope we do win.

My problem isn’t individual results – the Kansas City win didn’t spark our season, and neither is the Seattle win, as welcome as it was, good enough on it’s own. Equally, I went out of my way to play down the loss to Cal FC, and I’ve tried to find positives in every defeat. It’s getting harder though. The trend isn’t good.

We, the fans, will endure this and emerge stronger for it. The Army will be in full voice against San Jose, and will sing till the final whistle.

I can only hope that the team at least match that effort.

* Actually, as was pointed out on twitter, Palmer may be suspended still. I haven’t checked, but thinking about it, it was a straight red so he probably will be. In which case, Jewsbury? Yay…?

We Are Legend

First off, I’ll just say I’m writing this on my iPod, which isn’t ideal. So no pics, and I’ll keep it brief. But The Timbers won. They beat Seattle, and there was simply no way I couldn’t talk about the game yesterday.

The tone for the day was set by the Army’s epic Clive Charles* tifo. As it rose, it snagged and tore a bit, but great work by the Timbers Army crew freed it up, and as the sun broke through, the full splendour of many hours of work was revealed.

On the pitch, the team also met similar problems. In the second half Seattle had us pinned back for long spells, threatening to spoil an outstanding start that had seen the Timbers race to a 2-0 lead, and only the most fervent of fans wouldn’t have felt queasy as time wore on.

Disaster, as it was with the tifo, was averted. Two first half goals had given the Timbers the cushion they needed to hold out during a second half that threatened to descend into chaos at times.

Kris Boyd’s opener came from a great low cross from Steven Smith, slotted home from six yards as the Seattle defence took leave of their senses. David Horst head butted the team into a two-goal lead shortly after from a corner.

The Timbers were rampant for much of the first half. Fucito buzzed around the attack, and Alhassan and Songo’o were finding joy where last week there was only woe.

Smith’s reintroduction to the team gave them an overlapping threat down the left that was so lacking against LA.

A quick word about Songo’o. I thought this was his best showing for the Timbers. He looked like he had purpose whereas previously he’s looked like he’s floated around with no clear goal in mind.

I still felt his best work came centrally – fortunately with Smith back in the team we had some width to compensate – with his behind-the-leg pass for Fucito in the second half a particular delight.

Also, I think it’s time to declare my man-crush on Diego Chara. I’m almost scared to considering my record – *cough*Perlaza*cough* – but seriously, how freaking good is this guy?

Watching the replay, I was mesmerised watching the Colombian dynamo. The guy is unflappable in possession.

The complaints about Xavi “only passing sideways” have largely died down as people have come to realise that he’s actually pretty ok at football.

So with Chara. Okay, he might not harvest tonnes of assists or send a fifty yard crossfield pass onto a sixpence, but watching him is a lesson for all kids on how to do the “simple” things well.

Three guys around him? No problem, he’ll pass through them. Snapping at his heels? He’ll lay it off and spin round you to get the pass back.

He never panics and kicks it away. He keeps his head up and finds his man, and then he’ll move and look for it right back.

He’s the beating heart of the team.

As well as a Xavi-like ability to circulate the ball so efficiently, he also has, to borrow another Barca/Spain player, the defensive instincts of a Busquets.

There was one point in the second half where he dived in to make a block, then got up and harried the play back from the edge of the Timbers box to the centre circle.

His play was a large part of why, even as Seattle pressed, the Timbers were able to hold them off.

Seattle’s attacking strategy was reduced to either shooting from distance, or falling over to generate set pieces.

Eddie Johnson, who seemed to have sharpened his elbows before kick-off, seemed to have a particularly tenuous relationship with gravity. Perhaps he suffers from Drogba’s Disease?

And Montero… He played like one of those entitled 16 year old shits who’ll scream the mansion down cos their daddy bought them a red Porsche instead of a black one. Fredy thinks the world exists to serve him and won’t take no for an answer.

When things weren’t going his way, he became ever more petulant. It’s a wonder he was able to go more than five yards without tripping over his bottom lip.

The ref has to take a portion of the blame. Time and again Montero, and a few of his cohorts, resorted to shoving and elbowing. If the ref had drawn a line earlier on and made it clear it wasn’t going to fly, perhaps some of the later unpleasantness could’ve been avoided.

Instead, Montero got away with what he wanted until Horst made sure he couldn’t wave it away. A weak performance by a ref who let himself be controlled by the match rather than the other way round.

The little shitehawk got his just desserts late on with a red card, at least.

It was a great day to be a Timber. It was a complete 180 from the LA match.

It’s still too early to declare a corner has been turned yet. I don’t like going negative after a match like that, but…

I wasn’t impressed with much of Nagbe’s work. He seemed a yard off the pace of the game at times. He seemed to get caught in possession far too often.

Similarly, at the back things aren’t perfect. Despite his goal, and providing a real threat from set plays, Horst still showed his worst side with a poor effort to win the ball in the build up to Seattle’s goal.

Teams will still generate a number of decent chances against us, but on this day Perkins came up big again.

The potential loss of Alhassan for a spell is also a blow after injury forced him out. The Ghanaian can have you pulling your hair out at times, but is always capable of a dazzling piece of trickery.

Let’s not end on negatives though. This may be the last Timbers game I catch live this season, and if so it’s a great way to go.

Legends were born yesterday.

The Abyss

Where to start?

Oh I know. Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuucking hell.

Okay, that’s out of the way, moving on.

So, the US Open Cup had already thrown up its fair share of upsets before Timbers took to the field to face Cal FC, an amateur side made up of ex-pros currently playing in the fifth tier. Cal FC already had a couple of notable scalps before rocking up to Jeld-Wen Field, and they were led by Eric Wynalda, a man who is to controversy what Eric Wynalda is to douchebaggery.

The worry was that Portland would send out a team of scrubs, get caught on the hop and suffer an embarrassing defeat but those concerns seemed to be alleviated when the squad announced was pretty much the regular starting XI. The Timbers were taking it seriously, and looking to send out a message that winning the cup was a major priority for them.

Unfortunately the Timbers would suffer a humiliation on a scale as yet unquantified by science.

A 1-0 defeat after extra time. To a team from the fifth tier. Oh, for fu-

It would be fair to say that the reaction on twitter was bugfucknuts. If #RCTID was a monkey enclosure, there would be shit EVERYWHERE.

The reaction is understandable. Passions run high in the heat of a shocking defeat. It hurts. It really, really hurts.

There are no excuses. We had the chances to win, we didn’t take them, we lost.

The fact is that the team played poorly. The first half was played at half-tempo, almost as if this was friendly. The Timbers looked like a team that expected to win. It was a certainty. Gonna happen. Any minute now. Just you wait and see. Written in the stars. Sure thing.

Chances came, chances went. No worries, there’s plenty more where they came from and one of them is bound to go in. Simple.

A brief flurry at the opening of the second half raised heartbeats a little, but soon the game slumped back into cruise control. When a penalty kick was won, it seemed that finally Cal FC’s resistance had been broken down. Truth is, for much of the second half, they looked like a team that had run themselves down to empty. The high pressing and in-your-face style of the first half had given away to a sit-back-and-wait approach, giving Timbers players an almost ludicrous amount of timer and space on the ball.

Kris Boyd buried the penalty in the corner of th… Wait, no. He absolutely murdered the ball, sending it sailing over the bar and, in doing so, let all the air out of Jeld-Wen Field.

Into extra-time, still pressing for the inevitable winner, the Timbers got caught on the break and Artur Aghasyan clipped it over Troy Perkins for what proved to be the actual winner.

I’m not going to make excuses for it. We were shit. All ends up, bad.

But I would say, divorced of the emotive knee-jerk reaction, there was a large slice of freakishness about the whole thing. The Timbers had an almost ludicrous amount of shots at goal. In fact, scratch that – not almost ludicrous, it was way beyond ludicrous. Over 40 attempts, 10 corners and a penalty kick. And still no goals.

The fact is, despite the angry lashing out on twitter, the Timbers still deserved to win this match. Yeah, it was horrible to watch, but they consistently outplayed their opponents, as you’d expect, but blew chance after chance and then let in one good chance at the other end on a break.

They weren’t “outplayed”, as some suggested. If anyone thinks the guys out there didn’t care about the match, or weren’t putting in their everything, they’ve never played sports at any kind of competitive level. No-one knew more clearly the disparity between the two teams positions than the players themselves, and there’s no way their professional or personal pride would accept anything other than a win. As they skulk out of Jeld-Wen tonight, you can be sure the players are hurting.

They lost on a freak result. An aberration.

If great chances hadn’t been missed by Perlaza (great timing on that article, huh? Though I’d still argue he was the best of a bad bunch in attack. But yeah, those misses. Baaad.), Boyd, Richards and Jewsbury to name just four, the result would’ve been vastly different. A half-yard here, a split-second there…

But, hey, it is what it is. Timbers lost and no amount of coulda-woulda rationalising will change that. The trolls will mock. The media will snigger. The fans will suffer.

We lost a match we should’ve won five times over, to a team we should be beating with relative ease. Big question will be asked in the wake of this.

How is left holding the blame when the music stops will be interesting. Will Gavin Wilkinson or John Spencer pay the price? Will it fall on a player or players to carry the can. After a result like this, the soul-searching almost invariably draws out a scapegoat. Someone to hang it all on. It was this guy. He fucked it up.

I don’t have the answers. Mistakes were made right across the board. I don’t think there is a The One to blame.

But, taking this match as part of the larger picture, there is a worrying trend emerging. This is a club that has so often looked like it’s lacked inspiration both on and off the field. I’ve already written about my concerns with Spencer, but to be fair to him there’s not much he can do about players passing up gilt-edged chance after chance when they cross the white line.

However, there’s no getting away from the fact that, a few bright spots aside, the football has been ugly this year. The strategy – get it wide, whip in a half-arsed cross for strikers to throw their hands in the air about when they don’t get a chance to attack it – hasn’t worked yet, but we keep doing it. We’re like the bee that keeps beating its head off the window in the belief that next time it won’t be there. We absolutely deserve to be where we are in the conference.

It may well be the problems lie higher up the totem pole. Whatever it is, something isn’t right. I could almost – ALMOST – shrug off a freak result like this if it had come in isolation, but it didn’t. This season is trending toward the basement, and that’s not where anyone wanted to be in Year Two. This was the year we were supposed to be looking up and ahead. Well, yeah, we are looking up but only to see just how far we’re slipping away.

The next few days will be interesting to see what happens, or not, at the club as the dust settles. Will heads roll? I’m not so sure, but equally I wouldn’t be surprised.

If ever a club needed a wake up call it’s this one, and they just got a firm jab to nuts. Where we go from here will make or break this year, and possibly a few careers.

#RCTID

Cascadi-argh

The problem with watching an M Night Shyamalan movie, apart from watching an M Night Shyamalan movie, is that you spend most of your time waiting for the twist – the shattering reveal that turns everything you just watched on it’s head. Shyamalan, after the huge success of The Sixth Sense (SPOILER ALERT: Simon is Hans Gruber’s brother), became “the twist guy”.

The Timbers have their own twist; their own little gimmick. They lose late goals. A fuckofa lot. And it’s getting every bit as head-smackingly tedious as Shyamalan’s third-act revelations did.

Despite John Spencer’s post-match insistence that losing so many late goals is “not a massive problem“ this season alone has seen the team lose 7 goals in the last 10 minutes of matches, while they haven’t scored a goal in that period. As Mike Donovan tweeted, in the last 20 minutes of home MLS matches, the Timbers have been outscored 4-18.

I really hope Spencer was simply trying to bat away negatives to put a positive spin on the match because if he really doesn’t think those figures represent a massive problem then I think we have the answer as to whether Spencer has lost it…

While the loss of yet another routinely sickening late goal may not have been a surprise, Spencer did pull a couple of rabbits out of the hat in his team selection.

I can’t say I was surprised to see Jewsbury back in at right-back, even though I thought Chabala had done enough against Chicago to keep his place. The shock was that Chabala didn’t even make the subs bench either. I can only assume it was a late knock (there were no injuries listed on the Friday before the match) because I can’t fathom any other reason why Chabala wouldn’t even make it to the bench.

The midfield was where the big shake up came, as only Diego Chara retained his starting place there. Songo’o and Wallace were replaced by Kalif Alhassan and Eric Alexander. Lovel Palmer dropped to the bench to facilitate a move into midfield for Darlington Nagbe, whose striking role alongside Kris Boyd was filled by Jorge Perlaza.

Despite my pre-match hope that we might see the team line-up in a 4-3-3 formation, it instead was much closer to the 4-4-2 diamond formation that the team had played earlier in the season, with Nagbe at the point.

It was an attacking set-up, and it looked like it would pay dividends early on as the play was much more fluid and connected that it had been in recent weeks. There were noticeably fewer hit-and-hope punts up the pitch, and much more quick passing and interplay.

If there is a criticism to be levelled at Troy Perkins – so often the Timbers hero in recent weeks – it’s that his distribution is often poor, but this week was much improved.

Though he had less to do this week than he had against the Fire, he still played the ball out short more often, with less recourse to the long ball. It’s a personal thing, but I much prefer to see the keeper look for that short throw or pass that retains possession and allows the team to build from the back than the lazy punt. The long ball has it’s place – to launch a quick counter, taking advantage of opponents that have overloaded the attack – but it’s seemingly the default setting for many keepers and it’s more often than not a waste of possession.

Perkins mirrored the play of his team-mates, which focussed much more on building the play through passing and movement. In this kind of system, Diego Chara’s role is crucial in the transition from defence to attack and vice versa. His passing is often underrated by some as he’s not one to attempt the “Hollywood pass” very often, but he keeps the play circulating with an excellent 90+% success rate.

His defensive play was characteristically strong, covering the area in front of his defence with steely determination. For a small guy, he’s deceptively strong as many bigger players have found out to their cost.

He was joined in midfield by Alexander and Alhassan. Alexander’s recall was a welcome sight, even though he was nominally the left midfielder, rather than playing through the centre where he seems more at home. At times it looked like he was a little over keen to impress having been given the chance.

Alhassan started after a good showing in a midweek friendly against Valencia. There are many similarities between Alhassan and Songo’o in that they’re both clearly skilful, flair players but equally both prone to trying to do a bit too much on their own. Both can frustrate when they try a flick, or try to beat a man when the easy pass is on to a wide-open team-mate but that’s the price you pay for the times when it does come off for them.

Not everyone agreed with me that Nagbe has been looking a little low in energy and confidence lately, but I hoped his drop into an attacking midfield role would reinvigorate him, and he did show little flashes of the player that can get fans on the edge of their seats.

At times he was playing as an orthodox central midfielder, but he adjusted admirably well. It’s good to see him more involved in play, and running at opponents again.

As the resident Jorge Perlaza apologist, it should be no surprise to read that I thought he had a good game. He worked tirelessly and got involved in play in a way that Nagbe doesn’t when he’s asked to partner Boyd.

Though he’s unquestionably a frustrating figure – his finishing can be wildly erratic at times – his ball retention is good and he is a good link between midfield and attack in terms of his running and ability to hold up the ball and feed it to onrushing midfielders, much like his countryman Chara fulfils the role in linking defence and midfield.

He also created a good chance for Nagbe early in the second half with a good run down the right and first time cross into the path of Nagbe who got under the ball and sent it sailing over the bar, as well as a couple of chances for himself. With the addition of Fucito to the squad, there’s even more pressure of Perlaza to perform when he’s given the chance, and I’d hope his strong showing against the Whitecaps is a sign that he’s taken the challenge on board and raised his game.

Kris Boyd got back on the scoresheet again after a poacher’s goal in 67 minutes when Jewsbury’s erratic cross was palmed away the Whitecaps keeper right into the area Boyd had staked out at the back post. It was a typically opportunistic bit of finishing from the Scot as he got himself in the right place at the right time.

Boyd is the kind of striker that does his best work off the second ball, where he has the strikers instinct to attack the area the ball is going to be. This was a prime example of this where skill and luck put him in the right place to hook the ball home. Too often though the Timbers are looking for him to win the first ball in the air, and this isn’t his strong suit especially against big guys like Jay DeMerit, who only minutes before the goal has clattered clumsily into Kalif in what looked like a stonewall penalty, but was waved away by both referee and his assistant.

Despite indirectly supplying the assist for Boyd’s goal, I thought Jewsbury’s crossing had been poor all night. I wouldn’t be surprised if Whitecaps defenders were drawing lots as to who would close down Jewsbury’s crosses, as to be the first man to a Jewsbury cross is to more-often-than-not get hit.

With Alhassan ahead of you, it’s a tricky job as his defensive work isn’t his strong suit. Jewsbury coped well in the defensive sense, but again I felt he offered little in attack.

The lead would last less than 20 minutes before a routine long ball was poorly defending, and Darren Mattocks, on the pitch for all of a minute, was able to breeze into the box and thunder the ball past Perkins.

The defending had been generally good, but here they switched off at the back, and were punsihed. Mosquera allowed Hassli to get the run on him, and Horst failed to cover the space behind his partner which gave Mattocks the time he needed to blow past Horst’s weak challenge.

It was a sickening end to a match that the Timbers will feel they deserved three points from.

It’s not just the late goals being lost that are a worry, it’s the inability to hold a lead. On 8 occasions this season the Timbers have taken the lead, but they’ve only held onto it 3 times. Of the 5 times the Timbers have lost the lead in a game, they’ve then gone on to lose 3 – the horrible run of RSL, Chivas and LA. In short – the Timbers are as likely to lose a match as win it when they go ahead! (3 wins, 3 losses, 1 draw – yes, that’s only 7, they took the lead twice against Chicago)

In a weird coincidence, the figures are mirrored when they go behind. 8 times they’ve slipped behind, and only 3 times they’ve found an equaliser – Philly (W), Dallas (D) and RSL (L).

The seeming inability to turn around a game when the momentum turns against the team is troubling.

Recent weeks have brought around better defensive performances, and for long spells of the game against the Whitecaps, there was much to be happy about the attacking play. A bit more luck or composure in front of goal and the Timbers could’ve been comfortable.

It wasn’t to be, and it’s another 2 points dropped – doubly galling as it’s against both a local and conference rival. It’s all very well complaining about the refereeing – and the Alhassan decision was especially poor – but as Mike Perron tweeted, “nothing takes a referee out of a game like finishing chances.” So very true. As long as the match is precarious, you’re always one defensive lapse from undoing all your good work.

Of course, if you’d watched the highlights on the MLS site, you might be wondering “what chances?” and “what (non) penalty?”. Thankfully the MLS site haven’t included the penalty shout in their “highlights” package. You want to see Steven Smith get a yellow card? Oh, you better believe that’s a highlight. You want to see a contentious decision that the officials clearly got wrong? Not a highlight. Neither are a number of decent chances at goal or passages of play.

I really hope whoever it was that compiles the highlights had a hot date last night to explain such a slap-dash and lazy job.

There’s often so much more that I’d like to illustrate and show through screengrab and the like but, as I don’t have MLS Live, I’m limited in what I can illustrate here by what MLS choose to put into their highlights. This match is probably one of their worst efforts yet – hence the lack of pics. I’d have loved to have written more about Perlaza, for instance, but there was next to nothing for me to do so in the highlights. Hopefully I’d get MLS Live soon, but for now I’ll just make do.

I do feel that progress is being made. The defence – a couple of weak moments aside – looks solid and didn’t look any weaker for having one less defensive midfielder in the team. In attack, with the reintroduction of Alhassan and seeing Nagbe played in his more natural position, there are encouraging signs for the future.

There’s a break in MLS action for the Timbers until the middle of next month, with a visit to LA to play Beckham FC. Before then the Timbers kick-off their US Open Cup campaign with the visit of Cal FC in midweek. The promise of a CONCACAF Champions League place for the cup winners should be all the incentive needed for the club to take the competition, and their amateur opponents, seriously.

There’s no doubt the fans already do.

#RCTID

Accentuate The Positive

Sunday night saw the Timbers battle to a 2-1 victory against Chicago Fire, a victory that ended a run of three matches without a win and over 7 hours without a Timbers player scoring a goal. It’s also the third match in a row that the Timbers have been unbeaten at home and kept a 100% record against the Fire intact.

With Jack Jewsbury out thanks to injury, it meant a start at right back for Mike Chabala. Futty Danso was a doubt for the match after his late game injury in the Houston match, but the MLS disciplinary committee took the decision out of the clubs hands by banning the Gambian for accidentally bumping the back Caleb Carr’s neck with his arm. If only Futty had kicked him square in the face instead as that doesn’t draw any sanctions, apparently.

Eric Brunner returned to his spot in the centre of defence, and those two enforced changes apart, it was the same team that drew in Texas that would face the Fire.

Again, what looked like 4-4-2 on paper played much more like a 4-1-3-1-1 as Palmer sat deeper, and Nagbe frequently dropped off the front line.

The Timbers knew their new-found defensive solidity would be tested against the speed and interplay of the Fire attack, but once more the team proved (largely) equal to the task.

Kris Boyd, for so long an isolated and frustrated figure against Houston, was much more involved this time round, and his early header from a Chabala throw-in produced a great stop from the Chicago keeper.

Indeed, it was from dead ball situations that the Timbers carved out their best chances on goal. The opening strike came from a corner, headed back across goal from Mosquera and skited into the path of Eric Brunner by Boyd, for the defender to score.

Relief was palpable as the long goal drought ended, but some things never seem to change, and after missing a couple of half chances, some sloppy defensive play allowed the Fire equalise.

While some measure of credit has to go to Pappa for the pass, the fact is it was another goal lost where the Timbers were undone as much by themselves as anyone else. Smith sclaffed his clearance, but all was still not lost had Palmer not gone to sleep and allowed Anibaba to get the space he needed to finish well.

There’s also the issue of three Timbers players huddled right in front of goal, which none of them awake to the through pass either. This is just poor alertness and concentration.

The team had almost come a cropper just prior to the goal when a corner was cleared to the edge of the box, before being worked back into to Pardo who was unmarked right in front of goal.

Fortunately for the Timbers, Troy Perkins came to the rescue once more, but if the chance had been a defensive wake-up call, it was one the Timbers failed to heed minutes later.

I thought Palmer had a decent game last week, but I can’t say the same here. While he wasn’t bad by any means, he is prone to lapses in concentration like the above and he seemed to drift out of the game as it went on.

In the second half he was a largely peripheral figure as he failed to impose himself on the game in the way that, for example, Diego Chara did, and does on a regular basis.

It will be interesting to see what John Spencer does when Jack Jewsbury is fit once more (presumably next week). Will Jack come in (as I assume he will) for Chabala or Palmer? My suspicion is that Chabala will sit, with Jack in again at right back.

There really is not much between Jack and Chabala at right back. Both have similar pass success rates, with Chabala perhaps a little more likely to get the ball forward than Jack. The two big differences I can pick between the two are that Chabala is a smarter full back than Jack, and his intensity is greater.

The reason I say Chabala is smarter is that I always feel he has a better understanding with the man in front of him than Jewsbury does. Despite the coach’s insistance that full back is the “easiest position to play” – something Jonathan Wilson might disagree with – the fact is that it’s not that simple – just ask Lovel Palmer, Jeremy Hall or Rodney Wallace. Chabala fits in much more naturally in the role, and his instinct of when to step up, or drop back is much more honed than Jewsbury’s, who often seemed to need that extra half-second or so to think about what he should be doing.

Chabala’s intensity was exmplemified by the little tête-à-tête with Nyarko just before half time. Chabala brings much more of a terrier mentality to the role than Jewsbury’s more measured, hands-off approach.

Both of these factors give Chabala a much stronger presence in the role than Jewsbury’s had so far. Spencer has already stated that when fit, Jewsbury will play which could, perhaps should, put Palmer’s place under threat.

If Jack’s place in the team truly is inviolate, then it would make sense to at least fit him in in his natural position, and a role he’s shown himself more comfortable in. We wouldn’t want square pegs in round holes, would we?

Of course, given the team’s victory this week, perhaps Spencer will bench the club captain and stick with the same XI, which would also be tough on Futty Danso who had started to form a formidable partnership with Mosquera, only to see Brunner slip back into the role and score.

Of course, I’m just a hopeless romantic who’d like to see us go to 3 at the back, but I don’t see that happening any time soon.

The half brought another line-up change, with the largely ineffectual Franck Songo’o replaced by Sal Zizzo. Songo’o is a player I still haven’t got a handle on. He shows some really nice touches, and good tricks, but he still, for me, hasn’t offered enough final product. Step overs and jinks are all well and good, but if you end up getting robbed of possession or your final pass is weak, it’s all for nothing. I can’t shake the lingering sense than Franck Songo’o plays for Franck Songo’o first, and the Timbers second. I could be being harsh on him there though. Maybe it’s my ingrained Scottish suspicion of flashy players showing…

Zizzo’s bag of tricks is certainly a lot lighter but he offers a directness that the team were lacking. Songo’o will look to short, quick touches, bringing the ball inside and looking to beat a man or thread the ball through the eye of a needle; Zizzo will take one touch, knock it past his man and go round him in his bloody-minded desire to hit the byline and provide service to the strikers.

Zizzo’s introduction saw the whole flow of the Timbers play change.

Much of the Timbers first half play was focussed down the left hand side, where Rodney Wallace was putting in a much stronger shift than he had in the previous match. His defensive work was much more focussed and he and Smith are starting to build a good understanding down the flank.

With Kalif Alhassan on the bench, now is the time for Wallace to firmly stake his claim to the left midfield role, and while he could do with a better end result for his work, he won’t do his chances any harm if he can keep up this level of play.

With Zizzo on the pitch, the balance of play shifted to the right wing, and his direct running and pace caused the Fire backline all manner of headache.

In the first half, the four tackles down the Timbers right-wing were all successful, from a Fire perspective. The situation changed somewhat after the break as the foul count rose.

Given that I just wrote a blog where I was largely critical of Spencer, it’s only right that I give him the credit for his changes in this match. Recognising that the Timbers were playing much of the game in front of the Fire defence, his introduction of Zizzo gave them a ball in behind, and someone who would run at them and stretch that backline.

Jorge Perlaza came on for Nagbe later on, for much the same reason. Perlaza’s running and harrying would keep the Fire wary at a time when the Timbers were defending a lead when Logan Pause turned home Boyd’s flick from a Sal Zizzo corner shortly after the restart.

Nagbe has cut a lonely figure these past couple of weeks. He’s not getting involved in the way he was early in the season, and when he does have the ball he isn’t the same exciting presence. Where at the start of the season, he’d run at defenders, get them unbalanced and look to get a shot away, recently he’s been more reluctant to go for the jugular and is instead looking to pass it off.

It could be that’s what he’s been told to do, or that’s he’s just not comfortable in the role he’s being asked to play, but to me he’s looking a bit tired, or low in confidence. A rest may be the best thing for him – it’s only his second year in MLS and young players will blow hot and cold.

Perlaza showed great energy in his short spell on the pitch, and helped out in the late game defence with good tracking and harrying.

The way the field seemed to open up for the opposition would’ve had some Timbers fans chewing their nails down to the quick, but Perlaza did well to recognise the threat and get back to fill in and get a block in. But for a cynical foul on the breakaway, Zizzo would’ve been clean through as the wide man again showed what a valuable asset his pace could be.

Despite a great deal of late pressure, the Fire failed to really trouble Troy Perkins’ goal, and that was thanks to some more good defensive work from the Timbers.

Compared to the Houston match, you can see that the Timbers were pressing higher up the pitch. The backline has stepped up, and the second line had also moved further up the pitched. Especially encouraging is a third line half way up the pitch as the Timbers sought to press high and force the Fire into mistakes before they could even get into dangerous areas.

While the lack of open-play chances is still concerning, the Timbers still ground out a win here. When your attack isn’t quite hitting top gear, exploiting set plays is more important than ever. Delivery has improved – Songo’o and Zizzo delivered great corners that lead to both goals – and players are making runs and movements in the box with much more intent.

Players are starting to return to the fold from injury, with Zizzo having an impact in the last two matches from the bench, and Alhassan now making the bench. It would be interesting to see these two playing the wide roles in future, though Zizzo’s history with the club last year suggests that Spencer perhaps sees him more as an impact sub late in the game, using his pace and width to stretch and get in behind tiring defences. I can’t really argue with that, thought I do think that Zizzo has earned strong starting consideration at the very least.

It’s also nice to see the Timbers push back when challenged physically. There was a time when this team could be bullied by other teams, but there’s been a recent shift towards giving every bit as good as they get lately, and indeed it was the Fire players who spent most of the game falling dramatically to the turf in an attempt to hoodwink the referee, who was switched on enough to book a particularly egregious example late in the match.

It was also good to see Boyd more involved in the play as he seemed to have the measure of his opponents in the Fire defence. He had a hand in both goals for the Timbers, provided the cross for Chance Myers to score an own goal in the Sporting KC match, and scored the last open play goal against LA. Crucial, much?

Next up is Vancouver Whitecaps as the Timbers kick-off their Cascadia Cup campaign. The Whitecaps have a number of attacking dangers that it will be vital the Timbers defence have the measure of, but they’ve also shown defensive frailties that can be exploited.

Now off the foot of the Western Conference, the Timbers will hope to keep that momentum going. The football may not be pretty right now, but the points are nice.

#RCTID